Coastal Invasive Species Committee

header_right_landscape

Latest Updates

Save the Date! June 8, Coastal ISC Spring Forum, AGM and Field Tour

 

Join an extensive network of practitioners, land managers and local citizens working to defend their community from invasive species in this full-day event.  

Our popular field tours are back and a  line-up of fascinating speakers to be announced shortly.  This is the 12th Annual Coastal ISC Spring Forum, AGM and Field Tour - Join Us!

When:  Thursday, June 8th, 2017 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Where:  Qualicum Beach Civic Centre (East Hall), 747 Jones Street, Vancouver Island BC

Early bird registration starts soon: Save $10 if you register before May 17th, $55 after May 17th, 2017.  

Check back soon for a full list of speakers and registration details.

 

SPONSORS:

BCID logos color newest versionQualicum Beach logo

Highlights from the March Knotweed Workshop: Presentations now available!

Japanese Knotweed 2013On March 10th 2015, Coastal ISC, BC Parks and BC Ministry of Transportation coordinated a very successful workshop on knotweed to discuss current treatment strategies, and identify knowledge gaps and research needs.  

Over 70 individuals attended the workshop from nonprofit organizations, businesses, and provincial and local governments.

We thank everyone who participated in exchanging information during this workshop! 

 

The goals of the workshop were to:

1) Share information about knotweed treatment methods from different locations.

2) Collaboratively identify effective treatment methods and their limitations.

3) Identify future strategies, knowledge gaps, and research goals to increase treatment effectiveness.

4) Contribute knowledge towards developing a revised best management practices document.

 

Speaker presentations (in PDF format):

- An overview of Knotweed Ecology/Phenology in BC (1.5 Mg)  - Ernie Sellentin, Coastal ISC

- The Knotweed Complex: BC Status and New Management Options (2 Mg) - Becky Brown, BC Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resources Operations

- Knotweed Genetics in the Pacific Northwest - Verification of our Head Scratching in the Field - Jen Grenz, Invasive Species Council of Metro Vancouver (coming soon)

- An Ecosystem Friendly Way of Treating Knotweed (8.5 Mg) - Dave Polster, Polster Environmental

- Invasive Species Management: An Assessment of Operational Data on the Efficacy of Successive Foliar and Direct Injection Herbicide Treatments on Japanese Knotweed (2 Mg) - Jeremy McClure, Invasive Species Council of Metro Vancouver

- The Long and Winding Road: Knotweed Control on the Olympic Peninsula (3.1 Mg) - Cathy Lucero, Clallam County Noxious Weed Control, Washington

- Knotweed Biology and Control (6.4 Mg) - Sasha Shaw, King County Noxious Weed Program, Washington

Read the summary of key workshop findings.

 

If you would like more information or have any questions, please contact us.

Many thanks to the BC government for supporting this workshop.

BC Parks  Coastal ISCBC MOT

 

Register now for Green Teacher's Invasive Species Webinars!

In November Green Teacher released our latest book Teaching about Invasive Species.  In the upcoming months several of the authors of Teaching about Invasive Species will be presenting on their unique topics during one hour webinars.

Green Teacher webinars provide professional development from some of the most important thinkers in the field of environmental education, and registration is absolutely FREE.

Sign up now to ensure you don't miss out on any of the following: 

 

Invasive Species: Towards a Deeper Understanding

with Lisa Zinn and Jonathon Schramm
Thursday, February 12 from 7:30-8:30pm EST

Invasive species provide an exciting story for environmental educators.  We have a villain (the bad invasives) and a victim (the poor helpless native species). Although this portrayal might capture a student’s attention, what is often lacking are the deeper ecological principles that come in to play. We will explore several myths often presented in the teaching about invasive species, and we explore alternative teaching scenarios that can be used as alternatives to these myths that can help students understand these deeper ecological principles.

Citizen Science Tackles Invasive Species

with Christine Voyer
Wednesday, February 25th from 7:30-8:30pm EST

From creeping vines to munching beetles to pinching crabs, invasive species are on the move. Monitoring the spread and mitigating the impacts invasive species wreak can be daunting tasks for scientists and managers. They need classrooms and communities to help. As students and community members. contribute observations and expertise to invasive species citizen science efforts, they learn about local ecosystems, engage in science practices, and use 21st century skills like collaboration and problem solving. In this webinar, Christine Voyer will share resources and the steps needed to help engage.

Invasive Species Learning Options

with Sue Staniforth
Tuesday, March 24th from 7:30-8:30pm EST

Invasive species are a serious issue world-wide, representing the second greatest threat to global biodiversity after habitat loss, and costing governments and communities tens of billions of dollars in control efforts. Unlike many large scale environmental issues, students and youth groups can usually do something about invasive species and in a hands-on, experiential way. In this webinar, Sue will review a variety of educational strategies and fieldwork planning tools that support young people tackling invasive species locally. She will also highlight some activities that engage students in identifying, surveying and mapping native and invasive species, investigating the impacts of invasive species on local ecosystems, economy, and cultures, and developing effective action projects.

Link to website here

VNHS Talk: Intertidal Cordgrass Spartina spp. Monday Nov.24th at UVIC

 

spartina p AM 3 smallThe invasive intertidal cordgrass Spartina spp. – Are we on the path to coast wide eradication? 


Spartina spp. have invaded intertidal habitat along the coast of California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. Where they thrive they convert interidal mudflats, important nursing habitat for fish and crustaceans, into monophyletic stands of Spartina, changing the waterflow and topography of this habitat. As the Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist of BC, Dr. Matthias Herborg will talk about these plants and their impacts, and how a coordinated eradication effort along the West Coast is dramatically reducing these invaders. Meet at 7:30 p.m. in room 159 of the Fraser Building, University of Victoria. Everyone is welcome. Bring a friend.

For more information visit the Victoria Natural History Society webpage: http://www.vicnhs.bc.ca/calendar.html


NOTE: Book Sale – by donation, throughout November at evening presentations. Books somewhat sorted by topic, e.g., botanical titles at Botany Night. To eliminate delays in starting the meeting proper, if you are interested in books, come early, preferably by 7:10.

 

Invasive plant survey now available!

The Invasive Species Council of BC and Miami University are conducting a survey about public awareness of invasive plants and they need your input!  The goal of the research is to see if voluntary initiatives such as our Plantwise program and 'Grow Me Instead' resources, have a significant impact on consumer awardness of invasive plants. The online survey takes approximately 10 minutes and can be found here.  

 

Getting to the Root of it: Town of Qualicum Beach Tackles Knotweed

 

 


For Immediate Release

Date: August 20, 2014                                                                     

Location: Town of Qualicum Beach, BC.

Getting to the Root of it: Town of Qualicum Beach Tackles Knotweed

A 2014 program aimed at eradicating invasive knotweed species from the Town of Qualicum Beach was announced today. The Town of Qualicum Beach, in partnership with the Coastal Invasive Species Committee (Coastal ISC), will offer a reporting and treatment system for invasive knotweed species. This pilot program is asking the public to report sightings of knotweed. The program aims to verify all knotweed reports within the Town of Qualicum Beach and to provide professionals to conduct treatment on select sites at no cost to the landowner.

“Knotweed species are extremely expensive and difficult to control once they have spread,” said Teunis Westbroek,Mayor of the Town of Qualicum Beach. “On a positive note for our area, knotweed populations are still small and we still have an opportunity for effective control.”

Considered one of the world's worst invaders, Knotweed is a hollow stem shrub (which resembles bamboo), that can destroy or degrade fish and wildlife habitat. Knotweed roots can penetrate pavement causing damage to infrastructure such as roads, walls and drainage systems. In the UK, Japanese knotweed has grown rampant, causing severe financial implications, including mortgages refused on properties with knotweed. Coastal ISC is asking the public to work with officials to eliminate the threat of this species before it becomes widely established.

"Knotweed is a bully in the plant world. It's an invasive and aggressive plant that spreads easily and can impact property values, the environment and cause safety issues on roadways. Visit Knotonmyproperty.com, or pick-up a booklet from the Town to learn more ways to defend your property from invasion” explains Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of the Coastal ISC.

A knotweed alert sheet, providing information on identification, proper disposal, and reporting options has been developed and is available on the Town’s website at www.qualicumbeach.com or here.

Coastal ISC appreciates the cooperation of all residents in addressing knotweed on both private and public land. Local residents can benefit from free treatments by stem injection by reporting Knotweed until the end of August. Treatments will take place in September.

To report infestations email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 1-250-857-2472. For more information on identification of this plant and its damaging impacts; as well as other invasive species that are being managed in your area please visit: www.coastalisc.com.

 

knotweed sign

 

 

Media contacts:

Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director, Coastal Invasive Species Committee.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Phone: 250-857-2472

or

Luke Sales, Director of Planning, Town of Qualicum Beach

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Knot on My Property: Aggressive Regional Program Tackles Invasive Knotweed

 

Capital Region, BC. MEDIA RELEASE

 

Considered one of the world’s worst plant invaders, bamboo-like, highly aggressive knotweeds are large, hollow stemmed shrubs that form large stands and destroy fish and wildlife habitat. Knotweed is now in our region.  Knotweed roots can penetrate pavement and damage infrastructure such as roads, foundations, walls, drainage and septic systems. In Britain, knotweed grows rampantly causing severe financial implications, including mortgage refusal on properties with knotweed.  Knotweed occurrences in the Capital Region currently are sporadic, and with the help of the public, eradication may still be possible.

Japanese Knotweed 2013

The Capital Region Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP), today announced the launch of the 2014 regional knotweed control program to eradicate invasive knotweeds from the Capital Region, before they take hold. The program has run successfully for the past two summers and aims to treat all knotweed reports in the region.  A service of professionally conducted stem injection treatment is available from now until early fall.   “In neighbouring regions it is already too late” warns Becky Brown, Invasive Plant Specialist, with the BC government, “These plants are capable of growing through four feet of concrete and can reproduce from a fragment no larger than the size of your small finger nail”.  

CRISP seeks the assistance of the public to report all outbreaks of knotweed.  If you suspect you have knotweed on your property, or notice it in other locations (public or private), please report to the Coastal Invasive Species Committee (email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 250-857-2472). Do NOT dig or compost any portion of the plant, as even fragments can re-grow. Cutting, mowing, and pulling stimulate shoot growth and may cause roots to spread further resulting in new infestations up to 20 metres away. 

"Knotweed is a bully in the plant world. It's an invasive and aggressive plant that spreads easily and can impact property values, the environment and cause safety issues on roadways. Look for www.knotonmyproperty.com to learn more ways to defend your property from invasion”, explains Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of the Coastal Invasive Species Committee.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Coastal Invasive Species Committee/ Capital Region Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP)

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or 250-857-2472.

http://www.coastalisc.com/images/stories/Documents/CRISP_knotweed_alert_web.pdf

 

Media questions and photo opportunities, please contact:

  • Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director, Coastal Invasive Species Committee.  
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Phone: 250-857-2472.

 

 

Regional Program Again Tackles Aggressive Knotweed

A regional program launched last year aimed at reporting and eradicating invasive knotweed species from the Comox Valley was so successful in finding and treating select knotweed locations, that this year the program has expanded to include all four local governments (Town of Comox, City of Courtenay, Village of Cumberland and the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD).

This program is in partnership with the Coastal Invasive Species Committee (Coastal ISC) and is asking the public to report sightings of knotweed. The program aims to verify all knotweed reports within the Comox Valley and to provide professionals to conduct treatments on select sites. To report infestations email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 1-250-857-2472 by August 15, 2014.

Knotweed Species

JK asphalt2013

Photos: AMillham of flowering Knotweed(left) and Knotweed growing through asphalt (right).

Coastal ISC appreciates the cooperation of all residents in addressing knotweed. Local residents in CVRD Electoral Areas A, B and C can benefit from free treatments by stem injection now until early fall, while knotweed treatments in Comox, Courtenay and Cumberland will be on public lands. Reporting knotweed is very important in all jurisdictions regardless of whether it is growing on public or private lands. By knowing where it is growing the various authorities can map the occurrences and understand the potential for spread of the plant over time. All authorities request that residents report any sightings of the knotweed species.

Considered one of the world's worst invaders, this hollow stem shrub (which resembles bamboo), can destroy fish and wildlife habitat, penetrate pavement causing damage to infrastructure such as roads, walls and drainage systems. In the UK, Japanese knotweed has grown rampant, causing severe financial implications, including mortgages refused on properties with knotweed.

Cutting, mowing, and pulling stimulate shoot growth and may cause roots to spread further resulting in new infestations up to 20 metres away. As well knotweed has the ability to regenerate from a very small root or stem fragment and can remain dormant for many years. This is especially problematic when growing near riparian areas as the fragments can enter the waterway and regenerate further downstream.

"Knotweed is a bully in the plant world. It's an invasive and aggressive plant that spreads easily and can impact property values, the environment and cause safety issues on roadways. Look for the Knot on My Property program on our website or pick-up a booklet from any four local governments to learn more ways to defend your property from invasion" explains Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of the Coastal ISC.

"This is a great opportunity to work with our local governments region-wide to proactively implement the treatment of knotweed species," said Edwin Grieve, Comox Valley Regional District board chair. "As it is expensive and difficult to control once it is fully established, this is a cost-effective means to gain effective control before that happens."

Knotweed treatedPhoto: AMillham - Treated Knotweed site in Union Bay, BC

A knotweed alert sheet, providing information on identification, proper disposal, and reporting options has been developed and is available on the CVRD website at www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/invasiveplants.

For more information on identification of this plant and its damaging impacts; as well as other invasive species that are being managed in your area please visit: http://www.coastalisc.com and click on the "Invasive Species" tab.

 

Giant Hogweed in the News

Once again Giant Hogweed has made local news headlines.  Two boys in Mechosin had a skin reaction and it was initially thought that they had come into contact with invasive Giant Hogweed; it later turned out that they had come into contact with native Cow Parsnip. Read the story here

GH Cowichan

photo credit: A.Millham - Giant Hogweed in the Cowichan Valley

Both plants are from the same family and both can cause a skin reaction, however Cow Parsnip is a native plant which can cause minor skin irritation while invasive Giant Hogweed is much larger and more dangerous; with long-lasting, serious burns, even blindness from contact. CTV recently interviewed Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of Coastal ISC - watch the CTV video here.  Another video put out by Metro Vancouver Invasive Species Council describes the difference between the two plants.

Cowparsnip leaf 2013Giant hogweed leaf 2013photos: Cow Parsnip leaf on the left and Giant Hogweed deeply lobed and serrated leaf on the right.  Note that the Giant Hogweed leaf can grow to 2.5 meters across (though this is not always the case)

Meanwhile the Friends of French Creek have been battling Giant Hogweed in the Errington/ Combs area for years; working towards eradication.  This dedicated group of volunteers manually remove plants each year, though they often have to go back to old territory before making progress.  Read more about their efforts here

FoFC Hogweedphoto credit: Friends of French Creek

And in Courtenay, a resident wrote in to the local newspaper saying that Giant Hogweed sites have been spotted there.

You can report sightings of the plant to the Coastal ISC's Hotline.  We recieve numerous reports every year from residents all over Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands and the Sunshine Coast; who are looking to identify this dangerous plant and looking for assistance with control methods.  We are able to coordinate treatment when the plant is on crown lands, can provide advice for private land owners as well as do our best to notify land managers.  We also have lots of resources, including photos and video, on our Priority Plants page.

GH flower

photo credit: A.Millham - looking up at at towering Giant Hogweed flowers

 

 

Coastal ISC Field Season Now Underway

Invasive plant treatment and control work is underway within the Coastal ISC Service Area, for the 4th year!Giant Hogweed Removal

Plants of greatest concern include Knotweed species and Giant hogweed.  For a larger list of plants we will be tackling, by priority, refer to our priority invasive plant list.

The field season runs from the beginning of July to late October - during which time, you may run into our field workers, a site recieving treatment, or one of our "Do Not Mow" or  "Herbicide Notice" signs.

The Coastal ISC works under a comprehensive pest management plan which follows 2013 doNotMow 524x800Integrated Pest Management IPM techniques and outlines specific requirements to manage invasive species on crown land. An appropriate combination of mechanical, chemical and biological treatment methods are used to eradicate primarily Provincially Regulated Noxious Weeds growing throughout coastal communities; plants whose removal is required under the BC Weed Control Act.

Due to the high risk of these plants spreading into nearby natural areas and private property, causing harm to people, the environment and infrastructure, the Coastal ISC works to control these highly invasive priority plants.  This is done on properties where funding has been provided.

Thank you to funding partners: Ministry of Transportation, Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resource Operations, BC Parks, Fortis BC, BC Hydro and some Local Governments. Their funding allows us to tackle infestations on road right of ways, parks and easements.

Preventing and managing the spread of invasive plants is everyone's responsibility!  Here is how you can help! 

 "Partnerships at work, reducing the threat of invasive species on coastal communities"

Page 4 of 7