Coastal Invasive Species Committee

header_right_landscape

Latest Updates

Spartina Workshop - August 7th- Courtenay

Screen_Shot_2016-07-20_at_11.41.55_AM.png

 

 

Spartina Identification Workshop 


On Sunday August 7th at 9 a.m, you are invited to attend a free 3 hour workshop hosted by the Coastal ISC and Ducks Unlimited Canada at the K'omoks First Nations Hall in Courtenay.  The event will consist of both a lecture and a field component: Matthew Christensen with Ducks Unlimited Canada will be covering topics such as what Spartina is, why it is a problem, what is being done about it, and progress to date, while Jennifer Sutherst from Project Watershed will be discussing native foreshore plants and eel grass restoration.  Afterwards, a workshop held outside on how to identify and distinguish Spartina from native foreshore plants will follow, as well as how to properly report and remove it.  Be sure to bring sturdy footwear or rubber boots and sun protection, as we'll be walking out on to the estuary just across the street.  Coffee and muffins will be served before 9 a.m, so be sure to get there just a little bit earlier!   


What is Spartina?

Spartina are invasive salt-tolerant grasses that threaten our shorelines by out-competing native marsh plants and reducing liveable habitat for wildlife.  They also compromise coastal industries such as shellfish growers, tourism and fisheries.  Some species of Spartina even have the ability to alter tidal patterns which can increase the risk of flooding in some areas.   


Why Should You Care?

Baynes Sound is an area along the Georgia Strait that stretches from just North of Comox to just North of Qualicum Beach and includes both Denman and Hornby Island.  It is also currently the only place on Vancouver Island that has Spartina (Spartina densiflora and Spartina patens).  Its presence here is particularly concerning due to the high volume of coastal-based shellfish industries located within the area, as well as the world-class diving sites located along Denman and Hornby Island.  If you are a resident, employer, or employee of Baynes Sound, or are simply passionate about preserving the coastal ecological integrity of Vancouver Island, then this workshop is for you.  By learning how to properly identify, report and remove Spartina, you are helping to protect our native plant and animal biodiversity and to keep our local shellfish and tourism industries afloat.    


How to Register?

RSVP to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call us toll-free at 1.844.298.2532 by August 5th to ensure your spot; space is limited, so register now to get involved in this exciting opportunity!


For directions on how to get there, visit www.comoxband.ca/contact

For information on Spartina, please visit Spartina.ca 

For information on native foreshore species, please visit projectwatershed.ca


 

 

 

 

Coastal ISC at the Salmon Festival in Campbell River

Watch for us on August 6th; we'll be setting up shop in Campbell River as part of their 49th annual Salmon Festival in Nunns Creek Park.  We'll be there to answer any of your questions regarding invasive species here on Vancouver Island.  We'll also have many educational materials that you can take home with you, as well as some live samples of some of the most common invasive plants here.  Gates open at 9:30 a.m.    

Local Governments in the Comox Valley Join Forces to Bust Toxic and Destructive Alien Invasive Plants

For Immediate Release

Date: May 16, 2016                 

Location: Comox Valley, BC               

 

Local Governments in the Comox Valley Join Forces to Bust Toxic and Destructive Alien Invasive Plants.

The BC provincial government has declared May as invasive species action month, and local governments in the Comox Valley have once again joined forces to bust invasive knotweed – and new for 2016 - giant hogweed.  Both plants are considered alien invasive species in BC and if left unchecked can wreak havoc on our local ecosystems and diminish property values. And in the case of giant hogweed, can lead to third degree burns when in contact with skin, due to its clear phototoxic sap.

This successful regional program, first launched in 2013, includes all four local governments, the Town of Comox, City of Courtenay, Village of Cumberland and the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD), in partnership with ‘Alien busting’ the Coastal Invasive Species Committee (Coastal ISC). The goals of the program are to verify all knotweed and giant hogweed reports within these jurisdictions to provide professionals to conduct treatments on select sites.

The 2015 program targeted 58 knotweed sites eradicating seven completely and significantly reducing infested areas by 75%. These sites are now recorded in the provincial invasive alien plant program database for tracking and follow-up monitoring and treatment. Effective control usually takes three to five years.

WANTED: Knotweed for: Extensive damage to private and public property and wreaking havoc on the environment 

Notes: Spreads by roots, seeds and plant fragments.

 

Knotweed is considered one of the world's worst invaders. It is a hollow stem shrub, native to Asia that resembles bamboo. It can grow up to 4 centimetres a day and causes serious damage to foundations, driveways, and septic system, as well as natural habitats. In the UK, Japanese knotweed has spread rampantly and now homeowners cannot secure mortgages or insurance on properties with knotweed. Cutting, mowing, and pulling can stimulate shoot growth and may cause roots to spread further, resulting in new infestations up to 20 metres away. As well, knotweed has the ability to regenerate from a very small root or stem fragment and can remain dormant for many years.

 

 

WANTED: Giant hogweed for: Stem hairs and leaves contain a clear, highly toxic sap that, when in contact with the skin, can cause burns, blisters and scarring.

Notes: WorkSafe BC has issued a Toxic Plant Warning for Giant hogweed

Giant hogweed is an herbaceous perennial. Stems are hollow, ridged, green with purple spots to purple-red and may have stiff hairs present.  When in flower, plants can grow to 6 metres tall.  Flowers are small, white and clustered in large umbrella-shapedheads and leaves are green and deeply incised (almost to leaf vein) and have three segments.  Leaves can exceed 2.5 metres in length.

 

Local residents in CVRD’s electoral areas can benefit from subsidized treatments by select spot application this summer, while treatments in Comox, Courtenay and Cumberland will focus on public lands.

Coastal ISC appreciates the cooperation of all residents in addressing knotweed and giant hogweed.  Reporting knotweed and giant hogweed is very important in controlling these priority invasive plants in the region.  The Coastal Invasive Species Committee is asking the public to report sightings of knotweed and Giant Hogweed until the end of May by email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or calling 250-871-5117 in the Comox Valley; toll free on Vancouver Island 1-844-298-2532.

"Knotweed - wanted for causing a huge headache across British Columbia, but with the public’s help we can prevent it from taking over our coastal communities. It's an invasive and aggressive plant that spreads easily and can impact property values, the environment, and can cause safety issues on roadways. This regional program will save considerable taxpayer dollars. Visit Knotonmyproperty.com, or pick up a booklet from your local government to learn how to defend your property from invasion” explains Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of the Coastal ISC.

“The spread of knotweed has negative ecological and economic impacts and Giant Hogweed has serious health impacts. We are pleased to work with our local governments region-wide to combat invasive species in our area,” said Edwin Grieve, chair of the Comox Valley Regional District electoral area services committee.

“Once again we're very pleased to be working in partnership with other local governments and our residents to help fight invasive species in our community. It's truly a collective effort. Taking these steps now is vital to protecting our natural ecosystems for future generations,"added Mayor of Courtenay, Larry Jangula.

A knotweed and giant hogweed alert sheet, providing information on identification, proper disposal, and reporting options has been developed and is available on the CVRD website at www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/invasiveplants. For more information on identification, common look-a-likes of these plants and its damaging impacts, as well as other invasive species that are being managed in your area please visit: http://www.coastalisc.com and click on the "Invasive Species" tab.

-30-

Media contacts:

Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director, Coastal Invasive Species Committee. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Phone: 250-871-5117

or

Doug DeMarzo, Manager of Parks, Comox Valley Regional District.  Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Phone: 250-334-6053

or

Nancy Gothard, Environmental Planner, City of Courtenay. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone: 250-334-4441

or

Kevin McPhedran, Parks and Outdoor Recreation Coordinator. Village of Cumberland.  Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone: 250-336-2291

or

Allan Fraser, Parks Superintendent, Town of Comox.  Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  Phone: (250) 339-2421

The Nanaimo Region Unites in the Battle Against Aggressive Knotweed and Toxic Giant Hogweed

For Immediate Release

Date: May 16, 2016              

Location: Nanaimo Regional District, City of Nanaimo, City of Parksville, Town of Qualicum Beach, BC.

The Nanaimo Region Unites in the Battle Against Aggressive Knotweed

and Toxic Giant Hogweed

The provincial government has officially proclaimed May 2016 as Invasive Species Action Month to demonstrate that targeting invasive species is a priority. In concert, the tri-central Vancouver Island municipalities which include the City of Nanaimo, City of Parksville, Town of Qualicum Beach and the Regional District of Nanaimo have joined forces for a second year to tackle aggressive knotweed and new to 2016, toxic giant hogweed.

“We are pleased to welcome the Nanaimo Regional District, a new partner in the 2016 program (final ratification expected at the May 24 board meeting),” explains Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of the Coastal ISC. “Land owners in the RDN can now benefit from subsidized treatment, increasing the goal of verifying all knotweed and giant hogweed infestations in the region and treating priority sites.”

Following a successful first year of the “knot on my property” program run in partnership with the Coastal Invasive Species Committee (Coastal ISC) which aimed to verify all knotweed reports within these municipalities and treat knotweed on select priority sites at no cost to the landowner. The results are in: the program targeted a total of 41 knotweed sites with 28 on private property. These sites are now recorded in the provincial invasive alien plant program database for tracking and follow-up monitoring and treatment. Effective control usually takes three to five years.

Local residents can benefit from free treatment by qualified invasive plant technicians and are asked to report knotweed and giant hogweed on their property until the end of May. Treatments will take place twice - in June and August. If you think you have knotweed on your property, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or toll free 1-844-298-2532.

Considered one of the world's worst invaders, knotweed is a hollow stem shrub resembling bamboo. It can grow up to 4 cm a day and cause serious damage to foundations, driveways and septic systems, as well as natural habitats. In the UK, Japanese knotweed has spread rampantly and now homeowners cannot secure mortgages or insurance on properties with knotweed.

Building on the success of the 2015 “knot on my property” program is the addition of another priority invasive species, giant hogweed, due to the extreme health and safety risks. Giant hogweed stem hairs and leaves contain a clear, highly toxic sap which when in contact with the skin, can cause burns, blisters and scarring. WorkSafe BC issued a Toxic Plant Warningfor giant hogweed requiring workers to wear eye protection and heavy water-resistant clothing and gloves.

Giant hogweed is a herbaceous perennial. Stems are hollow, ridged, green with purple spots to purple-red and may have stiff hairs present.  When in flower, plants can grow to 6 metres tall.  Flowers are small, white and clustered in large umbrella-shapedheads and leaves are green and deeply incised (almost to leaf vein) and have three segments.  Leaves can exceed 2.5 metres in length.

Both giant hogweed and knotweed when left alone can spread into riparian areas and out-compete native vegetation. Since both knotweed and hogweed dies back annually, bare soil is exposed contributing to bank instability and increased bank erosion. The program aims to target infestations prior to them spreading into sensitive riparian areas.

“The issue of invasive species crosses jurisdictional boundaries and it will take a combined effort and collaboration to rid our region of destructive plants like knotweed,” said Mayor Teunis Westbroek, Town of Qualicum Beach.

“We are pleased to be working with local municipalities to eradicate knotweed and hogweed. We recognize both are invasive and aggressive plants which spread easily and can impact property values and the environment,” added Marc Lefebvre, Mayor of the City of Parksville.

“Invasive plants like knotweed and giant hogweed can have a devastating impact on the health and economy of our communities. By working together we can help reduce the spread of these dangerous plants in the mid-Island region,” said Bill McKay, Mayor, City of Nanaimo.

Coastal ISC is asking the public to help eliminate the threat of this species before it becomes more widespread. 

 

"We have a responsibility to change our behaviour and prevent invasive species like knotweed and giant hogweed from causing harm to people, ecosystems and our economy. This subsidized regional program will save significant taxpayer dollars. Visit www.coastalisc.com or pickup a booklet from your municipality to learn how to defend your property from knotweed invasion and identify giant hogweed to protect yourself from being burned by phototoxic sap,” explains Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director of the Coastal ISC.

For more information on how to identify these plants and their damaging impacts; as well as other invasive species that are being managed in your area please visit www.coastalisc.com.

-30-

Media contacts:

Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director, Coastal Invasive Species Committee.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Phone: 250-871-5117

or

Rob Lawrance, Environmental Planner, City of Nanaimo

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Phone: 250-755-7582

Deb Tardiff, Manager of Communications, City of Parksville

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Phone : 250-954-3073

Luke Sales, Director of Planning, Town of Qualicum Beach

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Phone: 250-752-6921

Christina Gray, Communications Coordinator, Nanaimo Regional District

Email : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Phone : 250-390-6554

Invasive Species in the Sunshine Coast - Community Event

Monday, May 16 from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Sechelt Indian Band Community Hall, 5555 Sunshine Coast Hwy, Sechelt.

Presents: Invasive Species in the Sunshine Coast - Community Event

IMG 0249The guest speaker is Jennifer Grenz, an Invasive Plant Specialist, who has been working in the field of invasive plants for 15 years. She is currently conducting research on the hybrid knotweed, Fallopia bohemica, and looking at the impacts of climate change on invasive species migration and their impacts on Indigenous food sovereignty.

Outline of the talk:

1. What invasive species are and why we are concerned

2. Successful battles against invasive species in other regions of BC

3. Sunshine Coast priority invasive plant list and treatment methods

4. Disposal of invasive species and how timing removal can help deal with biomass

5. Where to start and prioritizing treatment

The talk will be followed by a Q&A session.

For more information, please contact Beth Brooks at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 604-885-6800.

Event Poster 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo: Giant Knotweed

Report TOXIC Giant Hogweed Sightings

The Cowichan Valley Regional District is encouraging residents to report Toxic Giant Hogweed and be part of the solution!

 

2016 GH Cowichan Post Card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on what Giant Hogweed Looks like and how to report it Cick Here

For information on what you can do to defend your property from invasive species  visit: www.coastalisc.com

May is BC "Invasive Species Action Month"

BC Government News Release

The B.C. government has proclaimed May 2016 as “Invasive Species Action Month” to help raise awareness of the environmental and economic damage that invasive plants and animals can cause if they become established in the province.

As part of Invasive Species Action Month, the government is encouraging British Columbians to learn more about non-native invasive plants and animals that can displace other species and have a negative impact on the ecosystems throughout the province.

The B.C. government works closely with the Invasive Species Council of B.C., regional districts, local governments, First Nations and community-based organizations to help prevent the introduction and spread of harmful, non-native plants and animals.

The Invasive Species Council of B.C. assists with invasive species program co-ordination and communications, develops best management practices in collaboration with local agencies, and helps increase public awareness and reporting of invasive species throughout the province.

The Province also provides ongoing financial assistance to support the work of invasive species groups, which includes the mapping of invasive species populations and treatment of high-priority sites.

On April 22, 2016, the B.C. government announced another $1.7 million for its annual invasive plant grants program. The money is being distributed to 31 regional districts, municipalities and invasive species organizations to combat the spread of harmful plants. This funding is in addition to the $935,000 already allocated by the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations for invasive plant control and management in 2016-17, and the $2.1 million allocated by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure for invasive plant control and management over the same period.

The government has also made significant investments over the past few years to counter the threat of invasive aquatic animals. In March 2015, it expanded its response to the potential introduction of invasive zebra and quagga mussels with a two-year, $1.3-million pilot program focused on early detection and rapid response.

In March 2016, the pilot program was expanded and made into a permanent invasive mussel defence program with $2 million in annual funding. The funding is provided by BC Hydro, Columbia Power, FortisBC and the Columbia Basin Trust. The program will see eight permanent mussel inspection stations installed at major entry points on B.C.’s borders with Alberta and the United States. Invasive mussels have not been detected in British Columbia to date and this program will boost protection of B.C.’s waterways.

During Invasive Species Action Month, the Invasive Species Council of B.C. is supporting a series of outdoor activities, a photo contest and educational events throughout B.C. to raise public awareness of invasive species.

More information and a list of upcoming activities is available at:www.bcinvasivesmonth.com

Each week, the Invasive Species Council of B.C. will also highlight ways that British Columbians can take action against invasive species:

By working together, British Columbians can help stop invasive species from spreading and damaging the province’s environment, infrastructure and economy, including the ranching, agriculture and tourism sectors.

Quotes:

Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson –

“Invasive Species Action Month is an excellent opportunity for all of us to learn more about invasive plants and animals and the damage they can do to B.C.’s ecosystems and infrastructure. I encourage all British Columbians to learn more about these threats and also check out the activities that the Invasive Species Council of B.C. has planned over the next four weeks.”

Minister of Environment Mary Polak –

“It’s important for our government, our communities and individual British Columbians to take action to reduce the spread of invasive species in the province. We have made great strides in recent years and we will continue to work with invasive species committees and community groups to mitigate damage caused by non-native species in B.C.”

Gail Wallin, executive director of the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia –

“We value our natural environment in British Columbia, which is why it’s important to learn how to prevent, detect and manage invasive species. It’s crucial that we continue to take action to stop invasive species from spreading in our waterways, gardens and agricultural areas.”

Quick Facts:

  • The Invasive Plant Program identifies sites where new invasive plant species have been found and responds quickly to contain and eradicate them before they become established and start spreading.
  • Invasive plant species that are currently being targeted in B.C. include: marsh plume thistle; European common reed; garlic mustard; knotweed; Spartina; orange and yellow (non-native) hawkweeds; knapweed; giant hogweed; blueweed; common tansy; tansy ragwort; hoary alyssum; field scabious; leafy spurge; purple loosestrife; yellow flag iris; Himalayan balsam; and Scotch broom.
  • Since 2004, the Inter-Ministry Invasive Species Working Group (IMISWG) has provided policy direction, co-ordination and collaborative delivery of provincial invasive species programs for British Columbia.
  • Invasive animal species that are currently a concern in B.C. include: European fire ants; impressive fire ants; American bullfrogs; wild boar; eastern grey squirrels; and New Zealand mud snails.
  • Members of the public can report sightings of invasive plant species anywhere in B.C. by using the Report-A-Weed or Report Invasives BC smartphone apps, by calling 1 888 WEEDSBC (1 888 933-3722) or by using the online reporting tool at:http://www.gov.bc.ca/invasive-species

Learn More:

Invasive Species Action Month proclamation:http://www.bclaws.ca/civix/document/id/proclamations/proclamations/InvSpecActionMnth2016

Inter-Ministry Invasive Species Working Group: www.for.gov.bc.ca/hra/invasive-species/index.htm

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia: http://www.bcinvasives.ca

Clean Drain Dry program: http://bcinvasives.ca/resources/programs/clean-drain-dry

Adopt a Highway program: http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/adopt-a-hwy/index.html

Register Today: Coastal ISC 11th Annual General Meeting

CoastalISC Join Us! 

 

 

April 21st from 9:30 - 11:55 a.m.

Vancouver Island University, Library Boardroom (RM #507), building 305 (see building graphic

900 Fifth Street, Nanaimo (see campus map)


 

 

PROGRAM:

9:30 - Welcome and Overview : Daniel Williams, President
 
9:35 - Guest Speaker: Jennifer Grenz, PhD (student),  "Knot What We Thought: Hybridization Changes the Nature of Invasive Knotweed Battle."
 
10:20 - Coastal ISC Program Highlights: Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director
 
10:35 - Coffee (Sponsored by Timberwest) and Director Nominations/Perspectives Meeting
 
11:15 - Annual General Meeting: Daniel Williams, President

12:00 - 3:30 - Coastal ISC Board Meeting (for Coastal ISC Board Members only)

Registration (Space is limited to 40 max): RSVP* (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
 
FREE to attend
 
* Registration deadline - Friday, April 15th
 
Pay Parking - Parking Lot N (off Fourth Avenue): $2.50/ 2 hours, $8.00 all day

Director Nominations:
Interested in joining the Board of Directors? Please review the perspectives/interest group available seats and present yourself at the AGM to submit your nomination.  Nominations are put forward during the Perspectives Meeting at 10:35 am. 
 
Membership:
For more information about becoming a member and to register please visit the membership page . Only members can vote at the AGM. 
 
 
Field Tour:
Date and location of the Spring field tour will be announced in June. 


For more Information about this event, please contact Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of phone: 250-871-5117
 
SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:
 
TimberWest Logo Medium
 


Registration Open: Invasive Species and Novel Ecosystems On-line Course, UVIC

The following course in the Ecological Restoration Professional Specialization Certificate Program is now open for registration.

ER 504: Invasive Species and Novel Ecosystems

September 12th to December 4th, 2016: Online

Instructor: Rachelle McElroy, Executive Director, Coastal Invasive Species Committee

Learn more at continuingstudies.uvic.ca/sustainability/courses/er

 

ER504 UVIC Course Image

 

Invasive Plants in my Garden? Grow Me Instead!

Learning which plants at your local garden store are really intruders in disguise

We all believe that everything we could ever need to create gorgeous, healthy gardens in our yards can be found at a garden center or nursery. It’s the first place that comes to mind when most of us consider buying new plants, picking up another bag of soil, or purchasing a hanging basket to give to your mother for mother’s day. But what if not everything that sits on the shelves of your local garden center or nursery is actually good for your garden and the environment?

Butterfly BushThousands of tax-payer dollars are spent every year to combat invasive species. If that is the case, then why can you buy so many invasive plants at local garden centers or nurseries? It seems a little backwards to sell the very plants that are causing all of those widespread issues. The root of the problem is that most people don’t know that the plants they are buying are not good for their garden or their local environment. Have an old rock wall that you’d like to cover with a trailing plant? Well your neighbor has some excellent English Ivy (Hedera helix) that seems to do the trick on their side of the fence and low and behold your local garden store carries plenty of it, looks like it is the perfect plant for you. But English Ivy ((Hedera helix) is an invasive plant and costs the BC government a lot of time, effort, and funding to remove from old growth forests where it is choking trees, weighing them down, and making it easier for them to fall during a wind storm. The towering giants that have stood tall and proud over the forest for hundreds of years are brought down by the one little ivy plant that cost you $4.99 to buy from your local home improvement store.English Ivy pull SSI

To help inform the public of which plants at garden centers are and are not invasive the province and the Invasive Species Council of BC have put together a program called “PlantWise” and a tool called ‘Grow Me Instead’ booklet and wallet card for gardeners. These educational tools list 26 of the most invasive plants available in the horticulture industry. But rather than just finger waging at the bad invasive plants the program identifies two plants that are good for your garden and can grow in similar conditions and/or look similar to the original invasive plant that is for sale. Take butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) for example; with it’s lovely long cone of flowers and sweet scent it has often been a popular choice in the west coast as an accent bush for yards and landscaping. But this invasive plant can grow extensively if not controlled and all of those lovely little flowers act as an excellent vector for seeds to spread. The Grow Me Instead booklet lists butterfly bush as an unwanted invasive and suggests Lewis’s mock orange or California lilac as respective native and ornamental alternatives. The two plants are the options listed that you can grow instead of the invasive butterfly bush.

GMI Brochure 2013 CoverThe first step in taking invasive plants off the shelves is reducing their demand. The PlantWise program aims to do just that and with a well-informed public and cooperative horticulture industry we can work towards a future where the only invasive plants we have to combat are the escapees left out in the environment and we no longer have to worry about the pretty little plants with a sinister disposition waiting on the shelves of your local garden store.

Get your copy of the ‘Grow Me Instead” wallet card, visit The Coastal Invasive Species Committee Booth at Seedy Saturday, March 5th at the Florence Filberg Center.  Booth sponsored by the Comox Valley Invasive Species Partnership- composed of the Comox Valley Regional District, City of Courtenay, Town of Comox and Village of Cumberland – have joined forces to combat the negative effects of invasive species on the Comox Valley community.

Coastal Invasive Species Committee: www.coastalisc.com

PlantWise: http://beplantwise.ca

Page 2 of 7